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Neighborhood Names, Part I

Posted on 30 May, 2018 in History | 23 comments

In the spring of 1756, the port city of Brest, France, hosted a handful of senior French army officers: Lévis, Senezergues, Bougainville, Bourlamaque, Montcalm. They were there to organize and accompany the massive force being sent to North America. War was on again with the British, and they were needed across the ocean for the defense of New France.

Together they waged the North American battles of the Seven Years’ War. Early on, those battles turned in their favor; victories at Forts Oswego, William Henry, and Carillon provided welcome news at the court of Louis XV. As the war raged on, the tide reversed; defeats at Québec City and Montreal forced France to pay dearly at the negotiating table at the end of the war.

These officers paid a steep price personally as well. Bougainville was wounded at Carillon. Bourlamaque was injured no fewer than three times, including a close call at the Battle of St. Foy when his horse was killed beneath him. Senezergues and Montcalm gave their lives at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham. Lévis, the only one to end the war physically unscathed, would die, mercifully, on the eve of the French Revolution, a conflict that would see his wife and two of his daughters guillotined.

Today their names adorn the upper town of Québec City. Lévis has a monument in the Parc des Braves and a short stately avenue that intersects with Chemin Ste-Foy. Bougainville and Bourlamaque have avenues of their own near Battlefields Park, while Senezergues Street graces Parliamentary Hill. The Marquis de Montcalm, who commanded them all, gave his name to an entire Québec City neighborhood and has a monument dedicated to his memory on the Grande Allée.

23 Comments

  1. Super interesting! I hope you write about my neighborhood, Limoilou 🙂

  2. Always reading about Qyebec – will continue to remember the trip I had with St. James Over ’50’ Club and you as our guide – keep me posted on the happenings of this unique city.

  3. Toujours très intéressant et pertinent Neil; merci!

  4. Merci, je ne savais pas toute l’Histoire, on parle toujours de Montcalm mais moins des autres…

  5. very interesting. keep info coming.

  6. merci de ces infos Neil tu es digne de la devise du Québec cher ami! bravo

  7. As usual, so informative and interesting.

  8. Toujours très intéressant et pertinent.

  9. Thank you Neil. Love the history lesson, as always. Also means more to have been there.

  10. Excellent post. It’s true that street names often reflect the history of a city – especially a storied history like Quebec.

  11. Hi Neil. Another very interesting mail and a lot of relevant facts about our lovely city. Thank you for this history lesson. Have a nice summer.

  12. Thank you Neil for those informations. Always nice to be up to date. See you soon, maybe in summer time.

  13. Neil, thank you for your post. We look forward to reading about recent as well as historic events in your beautiful city. They bring back memories of our short visit in October 2016.
    Keep writing,
    Laraine Bunt

  14. Great post Neil. Thanks!

  15. Thank you Neil for those interesting comments

  16. Thanks Neil for the information. Love your posts.

  17. Thanks so much. I enjoy reading your articles

  18. I always enjoy these informative pieces.

  19. Thank you again. A really interesting piece and yet again, giving me ideas of returning to Quebec one day.

  20. Great piece. Keep them coming.

  21. Neil, I enjoyed this bit of history! Please keep them coming!!! Thank you!

  22. Interesting as always. Canadian history is something we don’t generally learn much about in the US.

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